Meet The Playwright: David MacDowell Blue

davidblue

David MacDowell Blue

GK moderates We The Infected, dedicated one of the most exciting vampire novels in years, Let The Right One In by Jan Alvide Lindqvist. A few months ago he interviewed the writer of this play about Carmilla and all sorts of things related to same:

You’ve had a long career in theater and a long love for this story – Carmilla. What caused you to write this play now? Was there some tipping point? Has this been something you’ve been working on – at least in your head – for a long while?
In a way, I’ve been trying to write this for over two decades! Or more! My first meager attempts at writing a play version go back to the late 1980s. But within the last five years I’ve rediscovered live theater in a big way by starting to review performances for my blog. And at the same time I’ve been writing more often than in years and years. With the upsurge of interest in vampire stories, just seemed inevitable I’d start work on a play version once more–but this time with less baggage, more skill and insight. Comes with age, I suppose. And tears. For example, when I first started writing Carmilla back in the 1980s I’d never lost anyone to death. Since then, I’ve lost both parents and a woman I loved. That tempers you, like a blade.

The play has an intriguing presentation in that the central character, Laura, is on stage in, well, two time periods at the same moment. I’m not sure of how to explain that or what the theatrical term for it might be. How did you come upon this – is this something you’ve seen done elsewhere – and do you see any risks for this will might come off?
Actually, I felt more-or-less inspired by Peter Shaffer and his his plays Equus and Amadeus, both of which do something similar. Quite simply, a character tells what happened, and events are acted out on stage to demonstrate. The added factor in my play is that the narrator (Laura) speaks to a specific other character (Captain Martin) with an agenda of his own. We see what happens, but we also see what Laura says happens–they don’t always match up. And we see Captain Martin’s reaction to same. When think about this kind of “flashback” isn’t so odd. Look at the Mrs. Lovett telling Sweeney Todd what became of his wife! Or for that matter Thornton Wilder’s Our Town. But having the narrator as part of events, that comes from Shaffer.

 How do you find the process of launching into a play, as a producer? You are the author here, as well, so that must play into it. Is it all-consuming, keep you up nights – or have you a means for keeping it from running you life for the next months?
Ha! The fact is, preparing everything proved more thought- and time-consuming so far. What helps most of all is that I’ve got help in a handful of folks aiding me, and the fact I spent so much time in preparation. Especially the last! In fact, I’d say that was key to any success we achieve!

Do you have a solid idea of what you want to do for sets, props, layout and lighting – or is this something that evolves as the play moves from the drawing board, through rehearsals and meetings and eventually to opening night?
Generally yes, but it will evolve. Always does. For example, we only recently decided that to highlight the historical background of events–Austria joining the Reich on the eve of WW2–to pretty much keep to the colors of the Nazi flag. Shades of black and white mostly, with specific dashes of bright blood red. Someone involved in the production wanted to somehow highlight that aspect of it.

And, of course I have to ask, is there any chance of you making an appearance on stage for Carmilla?
Only if something goes terribly wrong and I have to fill in one of the parts!

Costume Art Examples!

Carmilla is vastly fortunate to have as a costumer Katie Jorgenson. She very kindly shared some of her artwork regarding her designs.

Laura.costume.renderFirst, the lead, Carmilla’s love interest and victim:

For Laura I figure that her access to clothing and fashion would be somewhat limited so I based her look on late 1930’s sewing patterns that were widely available and figure that she and Madame Peradon would probably be making a  lot of their own clothing. The fabric is a warm grey with a very subtle floral Jacquard weave, and the contrasting fabric is a cream color with a woven floral motif.

Countess.costume.render

And then the mysterious woman who claims to be Carmilla’s mother:

For the Countess I found this really interesting metallic deep red printed fabric that looks almost black in certain light and then light red from other angles and is reversible to grey/black on the other side (which I used for the belt). It has a subtle floral/rose print to it that I thought would give her a sort of gypsy feel to her. I found a lot of images with women wearing fur stoles around their necks and I figured this would be an easy way to accessorize her and glam her up a little. (And I could make a faux one) Crazy hats were also prevalent so I thought a velvet black hat with some black netting would give her looks some added drama.

Carmilla_day.render

Finally, the title character:

So for Carmilla‘s daytime look I based it off of a late 1930’s dress that I found online but changed it to a deep red velvet. I thought it would be interesting if she wore all of the colors of the nazi flag between her two costumes.

Meet the Cast: Annalee Scott

introducing.ingrid

Annalee Scott plays a character far removed from her inspiration in the LeFanu’s novella! Baron Vordenberg in Carmilla is a nobleman living in genteel poverty whose ancestor once fell in love with a girl, a girl who became a vampire.

So tell me about yourself.  Who is Annalee Scott?
I didn’t always know that I wanted to be an Actress.  I spent most of my adolescence playing sports, doing competitive Irish Step Dance, and playing music.  However, growing up in Concord Massachusetts, I was constantly surrounded by old homes owned by famous authors and stories of past battles fought during the American Revolution so history and literature have always been a big part of my life.  Once I discovered theater I found a way to live inside these stories and influence people with their meanings.  I don’t see storytelling as an escape from the world but a way to take a closer look at humanity and purge the emotions we often carry deep within ourselves but cannot easily release.  To be immersed in books, movies, and the arts we face ourselves head on and discover our strengths and weaknesses.
I graduated from Emerson College with a BA in Theater and a Minor in Dance and despite the decision to pursue my acting career in Los Angeles, which is mainly dominated by the film and television industry, I have been lucky to find fun and interesting theater to busy myself with.  Which is why I couldn’t be more thrilled to be a part of this awesome production!
How did you come to be involved in this production?
Period pieces are my favorite and after reading the breakdown I decided to audition.  I’m attracted to dark material and was initially intrigued by the characters and the world they live in.
 
Were you at all familiar with the story of Carmilla before this?
Even though period and fantasy pieces are my favorite I’d never heard of this story before.  It’s been a treat to learn some of the history surrounding this gothic tale and the effect it might have had on it’s 19th century readers.
 
What about vampires?  Interested? Not? Any favorites?
People often say I look like Jessica from the HBO show True Blood.  If the implication is that I look like a vampire than perhaps secretly I am one.  Otherwise, I wish I could say vampires have always been an interest of mine but I’ve only just recently joined the vastly growing fan club.
 
Tell me about your character, Ingrid.
Ingrid in my mind represents the masses.  She is not the hero of the story but a woman who, even though she is a prominent public figure, tries to blend in with her rapidly changing environment despite its grave implications.  She is a survivalist and as the last living member of her noble family does what she can to take care of herself and carry on within her means.  Although cautious, she is easily influenced by others giving her a relatable vulnerability that we all feel from time to time.
What are your personal hopes in this production, and how do you hope the audience will react?
I hope to make people uncomfortable and intrigued.  Each of our characters have moments in the story which explore fear and desire sometimes at the same time.  I hope people are able to enjoy themselves and be entertained while taking something deeper away, whatever that may be to each individual.

Meet The Cast: Irwin Moskowitz

 

introducing.peddlerA character often omitted from LeFanu’s story is the peddler, the first to suspect there’s perhaps something odd about Laura’s visitor.

So tell me about yourself. Who is Irwin Moskowitz?

Growing up in Pittsburgh, I spent many Saturday afternoons at the movies.  And I watched every movie I could back in the day when there were only three channels.  Among the many films I watched were the early talkies including Dracula and Frankenstein.  I like to point out that the budget on the original Dracula was so small, it did not include music/soundtrack.  See it today and there’s no music, like Hitchcock’s The Birds.  But I digress.   A movie lover from the get-go, guilty as charged.

At the U. of Pittsburgh,  I majored in Psychology and Theater, getting great “college” theatrical acting experience including playing assorted characters in Spoon River Anthology and other roles both on the main stage at the Stephen Foster Memorial and the black box of its time, the Studio Theater.
I moved to Los Angeles as soon as I graduated from Pitt and hoped to land a big show business gig.  Still waiting for that to happen, I decided to be “practical” and got an MBA from UCLA.  My class had quite a few “artistic” students in the Business School, and we put on a production of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.  I got to play Charlie Brown.  Sweet.  I put aside my acting career and worked in Marketing, Brand Identity, Real Estate and Banking.  I sat in the audience for years thinking what I shoulda, coulda and woulda but dinta.
Flash forward to four years ago when I became ill, so I became an extra.   Mostly awful work, to be sure.   I said we were potted plants the production was required to feed.  Real potted plants, unfortunately, got more respect than the extras.  But, I got to work on sets and see how tv shows/movies are made.  Very, very slowly.  Feeling better and with all my extra work (ha!) under my belt, I auditioned for theater productions in LA and got cast.  I had a leading role in A Big Gay North Hollywood Wedding which ran for six months.  Most recently, I played President Harry Truman in Presidential Suite in NOHO.  I love theater work.  It’s tough, yet wonderfully rewarding.   I liken the thrill of going onstage to what a skier must sense when he takes off down the mountain, only more dangerous.
Next up, Carmilla!

I already know the answer, but how did you come to be involved in Carmilla?

Answering an Actor’s Access call for Carmilla, I auditioned for the role of Laura’s father and other characters, including The Peddler.  Carmilla’s story has moved to 1938 Austria prior to the onset of WWII.   To me, The Peddler (“Carlsberg”), represents a minority figure unlikely to survive the war.   He must do what he can to survive in a hostile, cruel environment, yet provides some humor in the melodrama.  I like to paraphrase Stanislavsky…There are no small parts, only small paychecks.

Were you at all familiar with the story before this?

I was not at all familiar with Carmilla or its story line prior to my audition.  I’d seen countless productions of all types involving vampires, but this is my first time actually working in one.

Are you a particular fan of gothic or vampire fiction?

Who doesn’t love vampire and gothic horror stories/films?  I’d seen the early B&W films on the Late Late Show, called Academy Theater in Pittsburgh, during the dark ages.  Also saw the Hammer films of the sixties, with Christoper Lee, for one, in living color.   The vampire renaissance likely started in the Seventies with Anne Rice’s Interview With a Vampire, but the number of films, et. al., about vampires since then are countless.  And now they’re on TV/cable and popular.  If anything can distract most people from their daily lives/grinds, it’s vampires.  What if?  If Only?  Wouldn’t that be_________________________?  Fill in the blank.  Plus, vampires are sexier than most antagonists so they’ve got that going for them, in addition to living forever.  You call that living?  No days, only nights.   Can’t imagine they make a Serta PerfectSleeper to fit a coffin.  You have to imagine your hair looks ok because you can’t see your reflection in a mirror.  And, although most everyone likes garlic, let’s be reasonable.   And who delivers blood when you’re hungry/thirsty?  You have to get your own!  Or have “people” get it for you.  Like assistants.   It’s gotta be a tough life, or whatever.

You’ve made an interesting contribution to the script itself since being cast. Care to tell that story?

Getting cast as The Peddler, I suggested that he have a name.  To my great delight, David Blue chose “Carlsberg” as his character’s name.  Not only does a name enable an actor to create a backstory, this character represents a vast number of individuals preyed upon, tortured and destroyed by people and situations worse than vampires.  Austria in 1938 was unlikely a center of fine art, culture and waltzes, certainly not to people like Carlsberg.
Describe your reactions so far to this production.
It’s exciting to be part of a world premiere production of an original play based upon literature more than a century old.  I’d heard of LaFanu and there have been films/plays based upon his work.  That’s a trip.  So looking forward to it!
Finally, is there any question you wished I’d asked? If so, what is it? And what is your answer?

No.

Meet the Cast: Elyse Ashton

introducing.countess

Elyse Ashton portrays The Countess, arguably the single most mysterious character in the entire story. LeFanu created a very unsettling atmosphere, in part by not answering certain questions. One of these remains the identity of the woman who claims to be Carmilla’s mother.

Tell us about yourself. Who is Elyse Ashton?
As an actress, I lean towards the classics and the bizarre. Some of my fondest theatrical experiences have been working on productions with the Grand Guignolers and Classical Theater Lab.Very different approaches and aesthetics!  I’m an old goth and this girl loves to dance! It’s fun to work those elements into performances  Theatrical life chose me, and every time I get discouraged and want to make a change, I am furiously swatted around by fate. My college degree was in French literature, and my studies led me to seek out and to love more literature written in my native tongue! I am a voracious reader and researcher. Languages, poetry and books fascinate me. As a woman… I like to remain a bit of a mystery!

Were you familiar with Carmilla before becoming involved in this project?
I  am a a big fan of Lefanu’s writings and that’s what drew me to audition for this project.  Lefanu’s home in Merrion square is one of the first places I visited in Dublin. Eighteenth and nineteenth century literature is my escapism, my happy place.  I adore faithful film versions–and sometimes even the bad versions— of these books as well.  In the 80’s I saw a crazy version of Uncle Silas starring Peter O’Toole on Masterpiece Theatre and knew I must search out and read Lefanu’s books. I never thought that Carmilla was done properly on screen, so I have developed very high hopes for this stage production after reading the excellent script.

So what do you think about vampires? Any favorites?

Oh…yes! Since the notion of vampires evolved into the more romantic, well mannered, rake and less the decaying, dirty, stinky versions of the myth over the last two centuries, there have been some lovely vampire characters that send me swooning. I have to go with Tim Power’s The Stress of Her Regard as one of my favorite vampire stories, because he includes some of my beloved romantic poets and even weaves in Lamia by John Keats.  Baudelaire’s The Revenant  is among the poems I recite  before every stage performance.
How are you approaching your role as The Countess?
There isn’t much in the original text, so I am letting my imagination run amok. I like to do a very thorough background. She must have qualities that Carmilla values:  loyalty, seductive charm and the noblesse which allows her to interact credibly with the sort of people with whom Carmilla wishes to make her temporary home.  Perhaps she was an aristocrat without the money to continue her way of life.  The setting of the play, between the wars, makes that a logical back story. She must have been left quite on her own, possibly losing her family in the Great War.  She also has to be a creditable actress.
In the original story, The Countess’ identity remains a total unknown. She claims to be Carmilla’s mother. But what is she? A vampire? A ghost? Some kind of witch allied with vampires? Do you have a theory? 
I haven’t made all my choices concerning The Countess yet. She isn’t Carmilla’s mother.  Carmilla’s mother is a distant memory and would have held some sort of sway over her daughter, which The Countess lacks. there is a line in the story about how the Countess looks at Carmilla with an emotion that was not affection. No maternal bond.  If she were her Carmilla’s mother, they could both insinuate themselves into households and work their spell.  That would be a totally different story!  There is an element fear, I believe, for the Countess in her dealings with Carmilla.  The Countess is dependent upon Carmilla’s favor.  I have not decided yet on the elements of her relationship with the supernatural.  Her powers do not equal Carmilla’s, and I believe there has to be some hope of gain or benefit attached to the Countess. Of course, one meeting with the director and all these theories could go right out the window!
When the audiences leave the theater, how do you hope they’ll be changed?

I hope they’ll be lured into reading Lefanu and other writers of the period, especially after the unsettling yet glorious dreams which Carmilla  is sure to inspire and then come back and see the show again.

Finally, is there a question I didn’t ask you wish I did? If so, what would the answer be?
Were you born in the wrong time?  On the wrong continent?  Yes.  Absolutely! But I’m sure the ideal gorgeous European centuries of my imagination bear little resemblance to the reality. I treasure my modern human rights, medicine, plumbing and technology…but I still like flounce around in frou-frou dresses and tiaras when given the opportunity.

Meet the Cast: Amir Khalighi

introducing.martin

Amir Khalighi recently directed a wonderful piece based on the works of the Sufi poet Rumi. He also took part in the second reading of an earlier draft of Carmilla. His character (named after a vague reference to a man in the novella) takes the place of the unnamed chronicler to whom Laura  tells her story.
Tell me a bit about yourself. Who is Amir Khalighi?
I am actor, director, father, husband, alchemist of my heart and soul on a spiritual path towards better understanding who I am.  But I’m assuming more focused attention should be placed on my artistic self for the discourse of these questions, so…. I was born in Tehran Iran. The Iranian Revolution thwarted me out of Iran and into the neon lights of the West. My start in the arts came at the age of 17 with a lead in the UJ Production of Our House then laid dormant until two successful productions, To Gillian on Her 30th Birthday and the critically acclaimed, Los Angeles premier of A Hatful of Rain. 2008 birthed me back into acting, picking up where I left off. I’ve studied under the tutelage of Sandy Meisner’s pupil David Blanchard, Stella Adler’s prodigy Jane Fleiss Brogger and Brian Reese in Hollywood. My recent works on stage include the role of King Saul in Whore’s Bath, & one of my favorite Shakespearian roles that of Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing“. My recent film credits include Drones (2014), Almost Broadway  (2014) &  The Darkest Hour: Survivors (2013).  I recently had my directorial debut in Rumination, which was based on the works of the 13th century mystic Rumi, which was artistically satisfying before we even reached opening night, I loved my cast and the process.  I’m a martial arts instructor as well, hold a 3rd degree black belt in Hapkido and taught for many years.  My love for my family is the cornerstone of heart and I love people as a general rule unless they are blatantly offensive in which case I revert to my martial ways.
How did you get into acting?
See above answer.
Under what circumstances did you become a part of this production of Carmilla?
I was approached by David MacDowell Blue the writer and co director of Carmella to read the script and give my feedback.  After reading the play I was drawn to the mysterious world created by David and told him that I’d be happy to meet with him in person to discuss my detailed feedback on the work.  After our meeting I encourage David to put together a reading and ultimately push to get this work on stage, which is coming to fruition.  I was asked to read for the role of Captain Martin for the table read and was later offered the role by Co-Director Mark Hein, in which I gladly accepted.  I had not heard about the story of Carmilla but was taken by it’s history and the palpable recreation by David MacDowell Blue.  The character of Captain Martin met the criteria of which measure all project I consider in taking on.  It would be challenging and layered.   I’m in.  In addition to a wonderful scrip, a challenging role I also wanted to work with co -director Mark Hein.  I’ve had the pleasure of recently working with Mark on stage and as his director but had not had the opportunity to be directed by him.   And finally, it’s Vampire Play, how could I say no?
Were you familiar with the story before?
No, but I’ve always wanted to be a part of a Vampire story.  I thought it would come from a television or film experience but I plan and God laughs.
Your character is Captain Martin. What are your thoughts about this person?
Captain Martin is a strong character to play and falls in line with my favorite types of roles to tackle. I enjoy playing, strong, authoritative men, Kings, Generals etc.  But there is more to this character that meets the eye.  At first look one can see that I am not a typical Anglican with the last name of “Martin” playing this role.  I have a darker complexion which would suggest a mixed race of some sort, which immediately adds a layer to the character.  Taking into consideration the time period and this mix of breed adds even another dimension and I believe plays well into the meeting between Captain Martin and Laura’s interview.  Minorities who have experienced bigotry have a deep capacity to bring an essence of compassion to the table for those in need.  Laura is in need, but this causes an inner conflict of sorts between doing ones job in interrogating this young woman to find the truth in contrast with the impulse to show compassion through naïveté or affection.  Time will tell what happens between these two characters.
As we all know, vampires are all the rage. Do you have any opinions or thoughts about the undead?
Well I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with Vampires.  It started with a pre mature viewing of Salem’s Lot when I was 9 years old.  That movie scared me for years and at the same time gave me a fascination into the topic.  Some of my favorites include Lost Boys, Fright Night, and soon to watch Let Me In.
What do you see as your greatest challenge in this part?
It may be fine tuning the right accent for the captain.  But I wouldn’t take on a role if it wasn’t challenging.
Is there something in particular you’re looking forward to during rehearsals?
The rehearsal process may be my favorite part of the theatrical experience… well opening night is right up there.  I’m looking forward to working with some pretty talented actors and seeing what is created between all of us and the directors.
Finally, what question do you wish I’d asked, and what would be your answer?
Are unicorns real?  Answer: yes.  I only know this because my daughter told me so years ago and then it was reinforced recently by Dennen Melody aka Madame Perradon

Meet the Cast: Deneen Melody

introducing.madame

The narrator, Laura, lost her mother so young she cannot remember the woman. Instead she was raised by a governess, played by Deneen Melody.

Tell me about yourself! Who is Deneen Melody?
That is a very good question! I am still discovering who this Deneen
Melody person is myself. However, I suppose I can tell you that I am a
trained ballerina from Texas that made the plunge into the acting world a
few years ago. While I was living in Chicago, I became highly involved in
the independent horror scene, but since made the decision to pursue other
genres and acting opportunities. I have also been in Los Angeles for just
about a year.
Since my move, I began to become more interested in theatre, which brings
back my love for the stage and helps with my training as an actor. I have
been very fortunate to meet so many kind, genuine people in the Los
Angeles theatre community that have encouraged me on this journey.
On a random note, my favorite thing in the world is the fantasy genre and
I’m obsessed with things like Lord of the Rings, The Last Unicorn, and all
the dark fantasy films of the 80’s. Oh, and I also have a thing for Thor
and enjoy Renaissance Festivals.

What did you know about the story Carmilla before becoming involved in
this production?
Actually, I was familiar with Carmilla and a few variations of her story
prior to becoming involved with this production. She is a character in one
of my favorite anime films, Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust, and I had played
a role similar to her in which I did a bit of research. However, it wasn’t
till I met David and Mark that I really dived into getting to know
Carmilla, Laura, and all the others involved. The story is certainly an
interesting take on vampirism and I’m excited for our audiences to
experience this particular telling of the story

Your character, Madame Perradon, is a romantic, fascinated with tales of
the paranormal. Does that strike a chord in you?
Absolutely. You are talking to a gal that is surrounded by all things
magical and supernatural. Light and dark. Where others may find it silly
and childish, I open up my heart and accept it. There are so many
unexplained things in the world…why should we choose to believe in some
and dismiss the rest? All stories come from some place, some truth.

How do you approach playing a role?
Every role is different, but I always find some common ground with each
and every character I portray. Even if I feel, in absolutely no way, that
I can relate to the character, I will read the lines over and over again.
I will reach into my very being and find something, anything, to connect
to. When I am performing, whether on the stage or in front of the camera,
I wish to be the character.
Being an actor is difficult, as are many things, of course. It is a
constant journey. As far as I am concern, I am always learning and
growing. I am a completely different actor now than when I first started.
I am a completely different actor now than a year ago. And I am a
completely different actor now than a performance ago.

Do you have any favorite vampires in fiction? Who? And why?
Well, as I mentioned above, one of my favorite anime films would be
Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust, and I have always had a soft spot for Meier
Link. He is tragic. At first you think he is this awful, dark being, but
then you learn the truth of his actions. It actually makes me sad just
thinking about it. He delivers my favorite quote from the film, too, in
which he says to the woman he loves: “I don’t want you to worry about
these wounds of mine. They will heal, and then we shall go to the City of
Night and distant stars. When we go there we can be alone, and free to
love each other.”
More recently, I enjoy the character of Eli in Swedish vampire novel, Let
the Right One In, written John Ajvide Lindqvist. I first saw the original
version of the film and was enchanted by Lina Leandersson’s performance.
From there, I read the book, and was instantly fascinated by the
character’s history. It is a different spin on what many people think of
vampires, especially with things like Twilight and those CW teen shows. If
you have yet to read the book or see the film, it is one I highly suggest.
There are so many ways to interpret who the character of Eli is and what
her true motives are, which can actually be said the same for Carmilla, in
my opinion.

(Note: Lindqvist has confirmed Let The Right One In was to some extent inspired by LeFanu’s Carmilla)

What do you personally hope for in terms of the audience, both for the
play and for your performance?
To be honest, I hope the audience comes out of the experience with their
minds racing. I hope they are as intrigued with the story as I am, so much
that they discuss the story and characters with each other. Who is good,
who is evil? Why is that character the way they are? What is the truth? To
me, anything that can create curiosity within an audience is a very, very
good thing.
On a personal level, this role is going to be such a challenge for me. To
play a character that is physically older than myself, well, it should be
interesting, especially when I tend to play younger than my age. With that
in mind, I truly wish to bring something interesting to Madame, something
that others may overlook. There is certainly more to her than meets the
eye, and I hope I will be able to bring that to our audience.

Finally, is there a question you wish I asked? If so, what would the
answer be?
You didn’t ask if I believe in Unicorns. And the answer is, yes. Yes, I do.